Visa on Arrival (VoA), Bali

List of Visas and Extension Options

Visa on Arrival and Visa Extension in Bali (VoA)

The Visa on Arrival for Bali Indonesia, also referred to as VoA, has been the main visa, most tourists have used in the last decades to enter Indonesia. It has nothing to do with the the newly introduced Free Visa Facility where citizens from more than 140 countries can enter Indonesia for free for tourist purposes, if they do not stay longer than 30 days. See the list of 140 countries below!.

So why would you have to get a Visa on Arrival and pay 35USD for a Visa that also allows you only to stay 30 days?
Because the Free Visa van not be extended or changed in any form. You will need to leave before 30 days. The Visa on Arrival however can be extended.


Costs: USD35

In the last couple of years, the government has changed the rules drastically in favor of the tourists, waiving the visa fee totaling tens of millions of dollars every year. Which is good news for the individual tourist, because they won't need to pay the USD 35 anymore. However, Bali and the infrastructure department, could do well with this money in the eyes of many observers. The government hoped, that the waiving of the visa fee, would motivate more visitors to come. We shall see if this will work out.


All other Citizens from countries that are not mentioned on the "free visa list", will have to apply for a tourist Visa BEFORE coming to Bali or other cities to Indonesia. They need to apply for a visa in one of the consulates or embassies in their home country or somewhere else outside Indonesia.


Process to obtain Visa on Arrival

  • No need to do anything in your home country
  • Passport must be valid at least 6 months (no exceptions)
  • Queue at Visa on Arrival Counter in Airport Arrival hall (before going to immigration counters)
  • Pay USD 35 (AUD, IDR, EUR also accepted)
  • Go to immigration counter and show your passport

Getting a Visa on Arrival voluntarily

Some visitors to Bali get a Visa on Arrival, even though they can enter Bali with the free visa and pay the USD 35 at the visa on arrival counter in the arrival hall at the international airport.

Visa on Arrival Extension
The reason is, because a Visa on Arrival can be extended once for another 30 days here in Bali with the help of a visa agent, without having to leave the country.

Therefore, if you want to stay longer than 30 days, (but less than 60 days!) and have not applied for a social visa abroad before coming here that would entitle you to stay up to 60 days, then you can buy the visa on arrival voluntarily. After a couple of weeks here in Bali, you can start the process of extending the Visa on Arrival, which takes around 7 business days, and is best handled with a visa agent.

Book your visa agent assisting you with your visa on arrival extension here.

Countries eligible for Visa on Arrival

Not everyone who is eligible for a 30day-FREE VISA can actually get a Visa on Arrival, even if they wanted to. Because this is a visa that can be extended once for 30 days here in Bali, without needing to leave the country, this visa type is still somewhat popular. Particularly if you need to stay something between 30 and 60 days, then a visa on arrival extension is in most cases the easiest option.

This signboard is placed at the airport and indicates which citizens can obtain a visa on arrival.

Algeria, Arab. Emirates (UAE), Argentina, Australia, Austria, Bahrain, Brazil, Bulgaria, Canada, China, Cyprus, Estonia, Fiji, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, India, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Kuwait, Latvia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg, Maldives, Malta, Mexico, Monaco, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Oman, Panama, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Romania, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Slovakia, Slovenia, South Africa, South Korea, Span, Suriname, Sweden, Switzerland, Taiwan, Timor Leste, Tunisia, Turkey, United Kingdom (UK), United States (USA).


Free Visa List (not Visa on Arrival!)

List of countries: Free Visa Stamp - 30 days, NO extension possible
Allowed for: tourism ONLY
Albania Guatemala Philippines
Algeria Guyana Poland
Andorra Haiti Portugal
Angola Honduras Puerto Rico
Antigua and Barbuda Hong Kong SAR Qatar
Argentina Hungary Romania
Armenia Iceland Russia
Australia India Rwanda
Austria Ireland Samoa
Azerbaijan Italy San Marino
Bahamas Jamaica Sao Tome and Principe
Bahrain Japan Saudi Arabia
Bangladesh Jordan Senegal
Barbados Kazakhstan Serbia
Belarus Kenya Seychelles
Belgium Kiribati Singapore
Belize Kuwait Slovakia
Benin Kyrgyzstan Slovenia
Bhutan Laos Solomon Island
Bolivia Latvia South Africa
Bosnia and Herzegovina Lebanon South Korea
Botswana Lesotho Spain
Brazil Liechtenstein Sri Lanka
Brunei Lithuania St Kitts and Nevis
Bulgaria Luxembourg St Lucia
Burkina Faso Macau SAR St Vincent and Grenadines
Burundi Macedonia Suriname
Cambodia Madagascar Swaziland
Canada Malawi Sweden
Cape Verde Malaysia Switzerland
Chad Maldives Taiwan
Chile Mali Tajikistan
China Malta Tanzania
Commonwealth of Dominica Marshall Islands Thailand
Comoros Mauritania Timor-Leste
Costa Rica Mauritius Togo
Cote D’Ivoire Mexico Tonga
Croatia Moldova Trinidad & Tobago
Cuba Monaco Tunisia
Cyprus Mongolia Turkey
Czech Republic Morocco Turkmenistan
Denmark Mozambique Tuvalu
Dominican Republic Myanmar Uganda
Ecuador Namibia Ukraine
Egypt Nauru United Arab Emirates (UAE)
El Salvador Nepal United Kingdom (UK)
Estonia Netherlands Uruguay
Fiji New Zealand United States (US)
Finland Nicaragua Uzbekistan
France Norway Vanuatu
Gabon Oman Vatican City
Gambia Palau Venezuela
Georgia Palestine Vietnam
Germany Panama Zambia
Ghana Papua New Guinea Zimbabwe
Greece Paraguay
Grenada Peru